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Black Thought and Culture (Alexander Street Press)

Black Thought and Culture is a landmark electronic collection of approximately 100,000 pages of non-fiction writings by major American black leaders—teachers, artists, politicians, religious leaders, athletes, war veterans, entertainers, and other figures—covering 250 years of history. In addition to the most familiar works, Black Thought and Culture presents a great deal of previously inaccessible material, including letters, speeches, prefatory essays, political leaflets, interviews, periodicals, and trial transcripts. The ideas of over 1,000 authors present an evolving and complex view of what it is to be black in America.

Full-text 1770 to current
Asian American Drama (Alexander Street Press)

Asian American Drama contains 252 plays by 42 playwrights, together with detailed, fielded information on related productions, theaters, production companies, and more. Some 50% of these plays have never been published before. The collection begins with the works of Sadakichi Hartmann in the late 19th century and progresses to the writings of contemporary playwrights, such as Philip Kan Gotanda, Elizabeth Wong, and Jeannie Barroga. 

Full-text late 19th century to current
Latin America in Video (Alexander Street Press)

Latin America in Video gives instructors, students, and researchers of Latin American studies, Spanish, and Portuguese a comprehensive and unique perspective on the region. This collection’s materials are presented in their original language with abstracts and indexing in Spanish, Portuguese, and English. Approximately two-thirds of the titles have subtitles.

Full-text 1970 to present
Latino Literature: Poetry, Drama, and Fiction (ProQuest)

Latino Literature: Poetry, Drama, and Fiction includes more than 100,000 pages of poetry, short fiction, novels, and more than 450 plays. Nearly all of the content is in copyright, and most of the other items are long out of print or have never before been published. Besides serving as a rich resource for literature scholars, the collection also supports the study of American history, ethnic diversity, immigrations issues, and political history.

Full-text 19th Century to Present
Black Drama

Black Drama, now in its expanded third edition, contains the full text of more than 1,700 plays written from the mid-1800s to the present by more than 200 playwrights from North America, English-speaking Africa, the Caribbean, and other African diaspora countries. Many of the works are rare, hard to find, or out of print. More than 40 percent of the collection consists of previously unpublished plays by writers such as Langston Hughes, Ed Bullins, Willis Richardson, Amiri Baraka, Randolph Edmonds, Zora Neale Hurston, and many others.

Full-text 19th Century to Present
Academic Video Online (AVON) - Alexander Street Press

Academic Video Online is the most comprehensive video subscription available to libraries. It delivers over 70,000 titles spanning the widest range of subject areas including anthropology, business, counseling, film, health, history, music, and more. More than 18,000* titles are exclusive to Alexander Street. 

Full-text current
Ethnic Diversity Source (EBSCOHost)

This full-text database is a dedicated resource covering the culture, traditions, social treatment and lived experiences of different ethnic groups in America. It provides full text from a growing list of sources including peer-reviewed journals, magazines, e-books, biographies and primary source documents. 

Full-text current
Refugees, Relief and Resettlement: Forced Migration and World War II (Gale)

Refugees, Relief and Resettlement: Forced Migration and World War II addresses the history of refugees on a fully global scale. Records within this collection cover the entire “war theatre,” from evacuations in Burma and mass migrations within central and Eastern Europe to the displacement of North African populations and resettlement of refugees in Latin America. Records from such sources as the foreign and colonial office files from U.K. National Archives in Kew, the U.S. State Department from the National Archives Records Administration (NARA), the British India Office collection from the British Library, and the archives of World Jewish Relief give researchers detailed insights into the complicated and shifting landscape across Europe, Asia, and Africa during and following World War II.

Refugees, Relief and Resettlement: Forced Migration and World War II represents an ambitious first step in a series of titles that will explore the global history of forced migration from the late nineteenth century through the mid- to late twentieth century.

Full-text 1935 to 1950
American Indian Movement and Native American Radicalism (Gale)

The American Indian Movement (AIM) was founded at a time of continuing social change and protest following achievement of national legislation of the Civil Rights Movement. The radical approach AIM adopted was based on its leaders' perceptions that early Indian advocacy had failed to achieve any tangible results by lobbying activities with Congress and state legislatures.

AIM used the press and media to present its own unvarnished message to the American public. During ceremonies on Thanksgiving Day 1970, commemorating the 350th anniversary of the Pilgrims' landing at Plymouth Rock, AIM seized the replica of the Mayflower. In 1971, members occupied Mount Rushmore; in 1972, they marched the "Trail of Broken Treaties" and took over the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) headquarters in Washington, D.C. In February of 1973, a group of AIM members took part in a seventy-one days long siege at Wounded Knee, South Dakota. The occupation was in response to the 1890 massacre of at least 150 Lakota Sioux men, women, and children by the U.S. Seventh Calvary at a camp near Wounded Knee Creek. During the siege, AIM occupied the Sacred Heart Church and the Gildersleeve Trading Post. Although periodic negotiations were held between AIM spokesmen and Federal government negotiators, there was shooting from both sides.

This collection includes the extensive FBI documentation on the evolution of AIM as an organization of social protest. In addition, there is documentation on the 1973 Wounded Knee Stand-off. Informant reports and materials collected by the Extremist Intelligence Section of the FBI provide unparalleled insight into the motives, actions, and leadership of AIM and the development of Native American radicalism.

Full-text 1968 to 1979
Meriam Report on Indian Administration and the Survey of Conditions of the Indians in the U.S. (Gale)

This collection comprises two sets of documents that details 40 years of failed U.S. government policies that deeply harmed indigenous communities. The first is the full text of the report entitled The Problem of Indian Administration, better known as the Meriam Report. The second comprises the 41-part report to the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs detailing the conditions of life and the effects of policies and programs enacted by the Bureau of Indian Affairs on Native Americans. Both of these collections provide unique documentary insights into harmful U.S. policies of settler colonialism and the impact of these policies on many major indigenous communities in North America, including Sioux, Navaho, Quapaw, Chickasaw, Apache, Pueblo, Ute, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Arapaho, Kickapoo, Klamath, and many others.

 

Full-text 1928 to 1943
Indian Trade In The Southeastern Spanish Borderlands: Papers Of Panton/Leslie & Company (Gale)

Comprising the papers of the Panton, Leslie & Co., a trading firm, this collection is the most complete ethnographic collection available for the study of Native Americans of the Southeast. More than 8,000 legal, political and diplomatic documents recording the company's operations for over half a century have been selected and organized for this collection.

The company was established in British East Florida during the American Revolution. When Spain won title to both East and West Florida in 1783, the company was granted a virtual monopoly. For many years Panton, Leslie & Company dominated trade with Creek and Seminole people. They eventually captured much of the trade with Choctaw and Chickasaw people, and were important in trade with Cherokee communities. The partners harbored a great antipathy to America, and used their influence with indigenous people to advance Spanish territorial claims against the United States, and to encourage indigenous people to resist white settlers and American attempts to acquire land from the tribes.

Full-text 1763 to 1901
Archives of Sexuality and Gender: International Perspectives on LGBTQ Activism and Culture

Archives of Sexuality and Gender: International Perspectives on LGBTQ Activism and Culture examines diversity in underrepresented areas of the world such as southern Africa and Australia, highlighting cultural and social histories, struggles for rights and freedoms, explorations of sexuality, and organizations and key figures in LGBTQ history. It ensures LGBTQ stories and experiences are preserved. Among many diverse and historical 20th century collections, materials include: the Papers of Simon Nkoli, a prominent South African anti-apartheid, gay and lesbian rights, and HIV/AIDS activist; Exit newspaper (formerly Link/Skakel ), South Africa's longest running monthly LGBTQ publication; Geographic Files, also known as "Lesbians in…" with coverage from Albania to Zimbabwe; and the largest available collection of digitized Australian LGBTQ periodicals.

International Perspectives on LGBTQ Activism and Culture:

  • Presents material from regions and populations that are not generally encountered in gender and sexuality studies, specifically southern Africa and Australia.
  • Offers a substantial periodical collection highlighting Australian LGBTQ history and culture from the 1970’s to the 2000’s.
  • Provides coverage of organizations and activists involved in LGBTQ rights in the twentieth century, as well as ephemera from each of the states in the United States and countries from Albania to Zimbabwe.
Full-text 1970 to 2000
American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Papers: Southern Regional Office Files

This unique manuscript collection offers digital access to the papers of the Southern Regional Office of the American Civil Liberties Union, primarily in the period 1945 to 1990. The collection has never been scanned or filmed before, and covers topics including school segregation; local challenges to busing; the suppression of voting rights; student anti-war protest; and legal cases relating to women, sexism, and overtime pay. The archive consists of memos, court documents, amicus briefs, publications, testimony, administrative files, personnel records, meeting minutes, and files related to the history of the Southern Regional Office. The papers are housed at the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library at Princeton University.

Full-text 1945 to 1990
American Indian Correspondence: Presbyterian Historical Society Collection of Missionaries' Letters, 1833-1893 (Gale)

A collection of 14,000 letters, from 1833 to 1893, written by Presbyterian missionaries documenting their interactions with indigenous communities of North America. 

Full-text 1833 to 1893
Indigenous People of North America (Gale)

Primary source digital collection for researchers studying the impact of invasion and colonization on Indigenous Peoples in North America, and the intersection of Indigenous and European histories and systems of knowledge.

Full-text 1600 to 1986
Sage Knowledge

SAGE Knowledge is home to an expansive range of SAGE eBook and eReference content alongside SAGE Video, containing over 5,100 titles. Content includes reference works, academic books, professional development titles and more. This cross-media platform allows users to search and browse over 10,000 items, video, book and reference titles within the Social Sciences. 

Full-text current Most

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